However, the IRS does not require taxpayers to report forgiven debt if the tax payer was insolvent at the time the creditor forgave the debt. Being insolvent means that the amount of a debtor's debts are greater than his/her assets (how much money and property the debtor owns). However, the IRS adds that "you cannot exclude any amount of canceled debt that is more than the amount by which you are insolvent."[17]
Some borrowers who cannot repay loans may turn to bankruptcy protection. However, borrowers should explore every alternative before declaring bankruptcy as doing so can affect a borrower's ability to obtain financing in the future. Alternatives to bankruptcy are earning additional income, refinancing, obtaining support through assistance programs, and negotiating with creditors.
no pl (Fin) → Kredit m; (in pub, hotel, shop etc) → Stundung f; the bank will let me have £5,000 credit → die Bank räumt mir einen Kredit von £ 5.000 ein; to buy on credit → auf Kredit kaufen; to sell on credit → gegen Kredit verkaufen; his credit is good → er ist kreditwürdig; (in small shop) → er ist vertrauenswürdig; to give somebody (unlimited) credit → jdm (unbegrenzt) Kredit geben; we can’t give you credit (bank) → wir können Ihnen keinen Kredit geben; (corner shop etc) → wir können Ihnen nichts stunden; pubs do not usually give credit → in Lokalen bekommt man normalerweise nichts gestundet; letter of credit → Kreditbrief m, → Akkreditiv nt

People all over the US are in search of credit debt relief, especially as credit debt continues to rise. In the last 5 years alone, consumer credit card debt has risen 20.69%. Furthermore, 15% of households report spending more than they earn each month and 43% of these households rely on borrowing or credit cards to fill the shortfall in their incomes. This means that thousands of families in the US are facing not only rising debt, but also the rising fees that come with not being able to pay off that debt each and every month.²
If you use financing to pay off debts in collections or the balances on your credit cards, you may notice an immediate boost to your credit score. If you use a balance transfer credit card, opening a new card will increase your overall credit limit, reducing your credit utilization ratio — the total amount of credit available to you that you are using up on your credit cards.
Non-payment: If the company asks you to stop making payments to your creditors — or if the program relies on you to not make payments — it must tell you about the possible negative consequences of your action, including damage to your credit report and credit score; that your creditors may sue you or continue with the collections process; and that your credit card companies may charge you additional fees and interest, which will increase the amount you owe.
Stay away from companies charging upfront fees. The government prohibits this under the debt relief laws – specifically the TSR or Telemarketing Sales Rule. You need to be very careful in choosing the right company to deal with because you might end up having to pay for more than what you owe. Know your rights and what to expect from legitimate debt relief companies.

Putting at least 15 percent of your paycheck — or income from Social Security or pensions — toward credit card debt and loans will help you pay down those obligations much more quickly because most credit card companies only ask you to pay about 2 percent of the outstanding balance each month. Making small, minimum payments means that your debt balances are collecting interest as each month or each year goes by. Paying off large chunks of your debt within a few months could save you a significant amount of money on interest payments alone.
But you don’t have to do it alone. We’ve got a plan that will help you get from where you are to where you want to be: living a debt-free life. Not only that but there’s a community of people like you who are on this journey of attacking debt and working to become debt-free. Sign up for a free trial of Ramsey+. You’ll get on the plan and find all the tools and resources (like that community we mentioned earlier) you need to help you get to where you want to be. Ready? Set . . . Start!

Interesting question. I’m not sure I follow 100%, but here’s my thinking on this. You can either pay them off in full or keep that lump sum for other financial goals and savings. The benefit of paying off all the debt may very well be worth it for your peace of mind. And there’s one very important factor here–the interest rates. If those are high (say above 6 percent), then I would absolutely pay them off. If they are low, then there is an argument that you will hear people make quite frequently, which is that your money can work for you and earn a higher rate in returns via saving for retirement, other stocks, etc.
Brittney Mayer is a credit strategist and contributing editor for BadCredit.org, where she uses her extensive research background to write comprehensive consumer guides aimed at helping readers make educated financial decisions on the path to building better credit. Leveraging her vast knowledge of the financial industry, Brittney’s work can be found on a variety of websites, including the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, US News & World Report, NBC News,TheSimpleDollar.com, CreditRepair.com, Lexington Law, CardRates.com, and CreditCards.com, among others.
DIY: Call the credit card companies, explain that you want to concentrate on paying off your debts, and ask if they will reduce the interest rate for you. Some may. Then pay your creditors with the same system: Determine a fixed amount you can send every month, and stop charging. As one account is paid off, pay more to the others until you're debt-free.

The consequences of bankruptcy are significant and require careful consideration. Other factors to think about: Effective October 2005, Congress made sweeping changes to the bankruptcy laws. The net effect of these changes is to give consumers more incentive to seek bankruptcy relief under Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7. Chapter 13 allows you, if you have a steady income, to keep property, such as a mortgaged house or car, that you might otherwise lose. In Chapter 13, the court approves a repayment plan that allows you to use your future income to pay off your debts during a three-to-five-year period, rather than surrender any property. After you have made all the payments under the plan, you receive a discharge of your debts.
Freedom Debt Relief has played a prominent role in promoting consumer protection legislation and regulation. In 2009 Freedom Debt Relief contributed to and supported the passing of federal regulatory measures that brought additional consumer protections to the industry*. During the drafting of the new regulations, the Federal Trade Commission received testimony from Freedom Debt Relief clients from around the country including California,[8] Oregon,[9] Texas,[10] Wisconsin,[11] Michigan,[12] Ohio[13] and Colorado.[14]
If you're seeking credit card relief, ACCC’s debt management program can help. A debt management program provides a unique way of eliminating credit card debt and is individually designed to meet your specific financial situation. If you are looking for to consolidate your debts, you may find relief through ACCC's debt management program. Our professionally trained and independently certified counselors will:
Savvy Money has a different approach than the standard debt settlement option for improving your finances without damaging your credit. The online calculator was interesting to use but ultimately the advice it gave was pretty simple. Is it worth $14.95 per month? It may be worthwhile to check out and see what their suggestions are. If you do sign up for their service, you can cancel within 7 days.
When I found the Debt Relief Legal Group, I was a month away from losing my house. They took the time to explain all the steps to me and were professional and courteous every step of the way. I was able to stop my foreclosure in time. Even though I’m still going through the steps, I have had nothing but professional service, comfort and assurance that it will all be ok. Their honesty and ethical practice from the Attorneys to the receptionist has been more than I can ask for.
To get started with Accredited Debt Relief, you'll need to enter your first and last name, email address, state of residence, phone number, and the amount of debt you're looking to manage (from $1 to over $100,000). You'll receive a call from one of ADR's representatives, and you are asked to have a recent copy of your credit scores and credit reports on hand to prepare for the discussion. You can get that information for free on the page after you enter the information described above, by clicking on the “Get My Free Credit Scores Now” button. During the phone call, the debt specialist will go through your credit profile, to get a feel for your situation and help you to understand the available options.
Reframing the way you think about money can help, too. “If I’m shopping and see something that catches my eye, I work out how much it will cost me in work hours, which really helps me to decide how much I want and need it,” Chinnock explains. “Another tip I swear by is keeping a list of my debts and savings on my phone, which again prevents me from splurging on something that I can’t afford or justify.”
Hi Barb, it’s hard to answer this in an absolute yes/no way. It depends in part on what you are consolidating. Consolidating credit cards are different than, say, your house (which you might lose if you can’t pay). Some people definitely live up to the challenge of paying off a consolidated loan in full (balance transfers with 0% interest are often a great way to save thousands in interest). But lots of other people plan to pay off consolidated loans and can’t meet those obligations if something in their situation changes, and that can lead to much bigger problems.
If you’re a homeowner with strong credit and financial discipline, tapping your home equity could be a good debt consolidation option for you. Home equity loans usually offer lower interest rates and larger loan amounts than personal loans or credit cards. Home equity loans have longer repayment periods, which can mean lower monthly payments but also more interest over the life of the loan. There are two types of home equity loans: a fixed-rate, lump-sum option and a home equity line of credit, or HELOC, which acts like a credit card. Learn more about each option and which may be best for your situation.
Similar to paying extra, submitting half of the monthly payment every two weeks instead of one single monthly payment can speed up the repayment of loans in two ways. Firstly, less total interest will accrue because payments will lower the principal balance more often. Secondly, biweekly payments for a whole year will equal 26 yearly payments, because there are 52 weeks in a year. This is equivalent to make 13 monthly payments a year. Similar to paying extra, make sure there are no prepayment penalties involved first.
No Guarantee...and may make your financial situation worse: Regardless of what they promise, there is no guarantee your debt will be reduced. Lenders are not obligated to accept settlement offers. Some lenders even refuse to work with debt settlement companies. Since you've stopped paying your bills, you've racked up penalties and fees on your existing debt. If the debt settlement company doesn't settle all of your debts, you are stuck paying the additional fees. On top of your debt. At the end you could have more debt than you started with, creditors with even more reason to hound you, and even worse credit.
In extreme cases, you may consider pulling money from your retirement account to pay off your debt. Beware, if you’re not at least 59½, you’ll face early withdrawal penalties and additional tax liability. The specific penalty you'll face depends on the retirement account you draw from and how you spend the money, but the standard early withdrawal penalty is a 10% tax. Plus, when retirement comes around, your savings will be short—not only from the money you withdrew but also from the interest, dividends, and capital gains you could have earned with that money.

Your debt-free date is the projected day you plan to pay off all your debt. Your debt-free day is projected because life comes at you fast and who knows what your income, housing, and life’s needs will look like in two to three years. Look at how much money you owe, and roughly divide your payments into months. Don’t take more than three years to pay it off, ok? You’ll feel frustrated, so aim for under three years. Write this date on your calendar. Shoot for sooner.


DMCC provides free education at its online site DMCC University. You can learn everything from creating a balanced budget, understanding and improving your credit, purchasing a home or developing a plan for a successful financial future. You can read from an extensive library of financial articles, watch educational videos, take an educational course online, sign up for our newsletter or use our educational tools and trusted resources to improve your financial health. We also provide free educational seminars for the state of Florida and New York. DMCC University is committed to equip you with the most complete education regarding all areas of your personal finances.  To learn more about what DMCC University offers and how you and your community will benefit, click HERE.
Filing for personal bankruptcy usually won’t erase child support, alimony, fines, taxes, and most student loan obligations, unless you can prove undue hardship. And, unless you have an acceptable plan to catch up on your debt under Chapter 13, bankruptcy usually doesn’t allow you to keep property when your creditor has an unpaid mortgage or security lien on it.

Truist, the result of the SunTrust and BB&T merger, is allowing customers to defer credit card payments for up to 90 days. You can request this deferral by filling out the online form on the bank website or by calling the company during its customer support hours. Credit card holders can also earn 5% back on qualifying grocery store and pharmacy purchases until April 30, 2020. 
Interesting question. I’m not sure I follow 100%, but here’s my thinking on this. You can either pay them off in full or keep that lump sum for other financial goals and savings. The benefit of paying off all the debt may very well be worth it for your peace of mind. And there’s one very important factor here–the interest rates. If those are high (say above 6 percent), then I would absolutely pay them off. If they are low, then there is an argument that you will hear people make quite frequently, which is that your money can work for you and earn a higher rate in returns via saving for retirement, other stocks, etc.
Filing for personal bankruptcy usually won’t erase child support, alimony, fines, taxes, and most student loan obligations, unless you can prove undue hardship. And, unless you have an acceptable plan to catch up on your debt under Chapter 13, bankruptcy usually doesn’t allow you to keep property when your creditor has an unpaid mortgage or security lien on it.
These loans have lower interest rates, and some offer tax benefits. That's why it generally makes sense to make only the minimum monthly payments on them. For instance, mortgage interest is deductible for federal tax purposes. Homeowners can deduct the interest paid on mortgages up to $750,000 for homes purchased after December 15, 2017. For mortgages taken out before December 15, 2017, interest paid on mortgages up to $1 million may be deducted. Interest rates have been at historical lows, right now around 4% for a 30-year fixed loan. Car loans are about 4.75% for a 60-month new-car loan.

Payoff provides credit card consolidation through personal loans ranging from $5000 to $35,000. As with comparable services that don't require you to use funds specifically to pay down/off your credit cards, Payoff won't help you with your credit card debt if you're not disciplined enough to use your loan for that purpose. Plus, Payoff charges origination fees on most loans, and customers have complained about poor customer service experiences at all stages of the process. We recommend that you look elsewhere for your credit card consolidation needs.
Editorial Policy: The information contained in Ask Experian is for educational purposes only and is not legal advice. Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer or other company, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities. All information, including rates and fees, are accurate as of the date of publication and are updated as provided by our partners.
Both are possible solutions to problems with debt. A debt management program is not a loan. It consolidates unsecured debts and tries to lower monthly payments through reductions on interest rates and penalty fees. A debt consolidation loan is actually a loan, with interest charges and monthly payments due. With a debt consolidation loan, you would have to qualify to borrow the amount needed to pay off your debt. The interest rate is normally fixed and, depending on your credit score and history, may need to be secured with collateral like a home or car. Debt consolidation loans usually run 3-5 years.
Holly Johnson is a frugality expert and award-winning writer who is obsessed with personal finance and getting the most out of life. A lifelong resident of Indiana, she enjoys gardening, reading, and traveling the world with her husband and two children. In addition to serving as Contributing Editor for The Simple Dollar, Holly writes for well-known publications such as U.S. News & World Report Travel, PolicyGenius, Travel Pulse, and Frugal Travel Guy. Holly also owns Club Thrifty.
While you're undergoing the debt settlement process, you'll likely see a temporary decrease in your credit rating. Depending on your credit rating before you began debt settlement, it may be difficult to obtain a mortgage for a time. If that's the case, you'll have to work to build your credit back up to qualify for a home loan. However, once you build your credit rating back up, you may be in an even better position to buy a house than you were before you began debt settlement. After all, you'll have fewer monthly debt payments to make, so you should be able to build up a heftier down payment for your home faster than you could've in the past.
Sort your credit card interest rates from highest to lowest, then tackle the card with the highest rate first. "By paying off the balance with the highest interest first, you increase your payment on the credit card with the highest annual percentage rate while continuing to make the minimum payment on the rest of your credit cards," writes former My Money contributor Hitha Herzog.

"Due to the impact of COVID-19, for eligible Card accounts approved from December 1, 2019, through May 31, 2020, for which you are eligible for a welcome offer, the period to make eligible purchases to earn your welcome bonus will be extended for an additional 3 months. Eligible Cards are U.S. Consumer and Business Cards issued by American Express National Bank to a Basic Card Member."
As you make payments on your credit card or other lines of credit, the liquidity risk is lower because you can quickly withdraw the money again if necessary (assuming your credit isn't frozen). That would increase your debt, of course, but it lowers the risk of being unable to keep the electricity running. On the other hand, if your extra cash is used to pay off an auto loan, you can't just get another loan in a couple of hours.
These loans have lower interest rates, and some offer tax benefits. That's why it generally makes sense to make only the minimum monthly payments on them. For instance, mortgage interest is deductible for federal tax purposes. Homeowners can deduct the interest paid on mortgages up to $750,000 for homes purchased after December 15, 2017. For mortgages taken out before December 15, 2017, interest paid on mortgages up to $1 million may be deducted. Interest rates have been at historical lows, right now around 4% for a 30-year fixed loan. Car loans are about 4.75% for a 60-month new-car loan.
Bank of America announced on March 19 that it will assist customers experiencing financial hardship as a result of the coronavirus. If you have a credit card with Bank of America, you can request to defer payments and refunds on late fees. There will also be no negative credit bureau reporting for up-to-date customers, according to a Bank of America spokesperson. 
Closing accounts may increase utilization. Your credit utilization ratio is the percentage of your total available credit on revolving accounts (such as credit cards) that you're currently using. A lower utilization ratio is better for your scores. Closing credit cards can decrease your available credit and lead to a higher utilization ratio if you keep other non-DMP credit card accounts open.

DebtGuru.com is a credit counseling and debt management company who has provided counseling and debt relief services for nearly 21 years. We know from experience that Debt is often the result of poor financial habits developed over time and these habits must change to achieve long term financial security.  Our service is geared to achieve financial success for you through professional financial evaluation and empowering you with financial education. DebtGuru’s program is legal, approved by your creditors and proven with nearly 21 years of successful debt resolutions.


A personal loan is a form of unsecured debt, meaning the loan is not backed by any collateral. If you default on a personal loan, you won’t lose anything, unlike if you fail to make payments toward your car loan or mortgage, which are secured debts. However, if you do default on a personal loan and your creditor sues you, a lien could be placed on your wages or property.
If you have credit card debt and need help settling it, however, Life Loans may not be the best company for you. While their service is free, they have no direct responsibility regarding any of the loans presented to the client. The website states, "all terms are between you and the lender." So, despite listing payment plan options on their site, they really have no say in what will happen with your loan should you do business with them.
4. Use a peer-to-peer lender. In an ideal world, you would pay off your credit card in full and be free and clear. But if you can’t do that, consider borrowing money to pay off your card from a peer-to-peer lender, such as LendingClub.com or Prosper.com. These secure sites offer loans with fixed interest rates that can be 20 to 30 percent lower than most credit cards, meaning you could save hundreds of dollars in interest on your debt, says Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, a cofounder of AskTheMoneyCoach.com, a personal finance site. If you have a job and a good credit score, you may qualify to make an online loan request for up to about $25,000.
Holly Johnson is a frugality expert and award-winning writer who is obsessed with personal finance and getting the most out of life. A lifelong resident of Indiana, she enjoys gardening, reading, and traveling the world with her husband and two children. In addition to serving as Contributing Editor for The Simple Dollar, Holly writes for well-known publications such as U.S. News & World Report Travel, PolicyGenius, Travel Pulse, and Frugal Travel Guy. Holly also owns Club Thrifty.
"Your daily habits and routines are the reason you got into this mess," Hamm writes. "Spend some time thinking about how you spend money each day, each week and each month." Do you really need your daily latte? Can you bring your lunch to work instead of buying it four times a week? Ask yourself: What can I change without sacrificing my lifestyle too much? 
In this situation, a certified credit counselor helps you find one consolidated payment that will fit your budget. Then they call each of your creditors to negotiate. It’s basically the exact same thing you do yourself. The difference is that these agencies have established relationships with creditors and proven records of helping other people get out of debt. So, even when a creditor won’t work with you, they often sign off on your enrollment in a DMP.
Bonds are debt securities, tradeable on a bond market. A country's regulatory structure determines what qualifies as a security. For example, in North America, each security is uniquely identified by a CUSIP for trading and settlement purposes. In contrast, loans are not securities and do not have CUSIPs (or the equivalent). Loans may be sold or acquired in certain circumstances, as when a bank syndicates a loan.
A low credit limit doesn't have to stop you from doing a balance transfer. You can transfer just one or two of your highest interest rate credit card balances to ease some of the debt pain. Before you consolidate debt with a balance transfer, make sure you’ll actually be saving money with the transfer. It's not worth it to consolidate debt and end up paying more.
A company can charge you only a portion of its full fee for each debt it settles. For example, say you owe money to five creditors. The company successfully negotiates a settlement with one of your creditors. The company can charge you only a portion of its full fee at this time because it still needs to successfully negotiate with four other creditors. Each time the debt settlement company successfully settles a debt with one of your creditors, the company can charge you another portion of its full fee. If the company's fees are based on a percentage of the amount you save through the settlement, it must tell you both the percentage it charges and the estimated dollar amount it represents. This may be called a "contingency" fee.
The great thing about Clearpoint is that their debt management program allowed me to consolidate the payments of 9 different credit cards into one single payment… They were the ones that contacted all the credit card companies and got the lowest APR possible. And they were very supportive too—there was never any judgment about what had happened or anything like that. They were just there to help, completely on board with me as a part of my team.
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The editorial content on CreditCards.com is not sponsored by any bank or credit card issuer. The journalists in the editorial department are separate from the company’s business operations. The comments posted below are not provided, reviewed or approved by any company mentioned in our editorial content. Additionally, any companies mentioned in the content do not assume responsibility to ensure that all posts and/or questions are answered.
The consequences of bankruptcy are significant and require careful consideration. Other factors to think about: Effective October 2005, Congress made sweeping changes to the bankruptcy laws. The net effect of these changes is to give consumers more incentive to seek bankruptcy relief under Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7. Chapter 13 allows you, if you have a steady income, to keep property, such as a mortgaged house or car, that you might otherwise lose. In Chapter 13, the court approves a repayment plan that allows you to use your future income to pay off your debts during a three-to-five-year period, rather than surrender any property. After you have made all the payments under the plan, you receive a discharge of your debts.
Your first step—before you commit to a credit card consolidation solution—is to understand your current credit. Once you know exactly where your credit card debt stands, you can find and then select a solution that meets your specific needs. As you move towards a zero balance, you can take steps to ensure that you maintain a healthy credit habit to keep balances low and credit scores high as your credit history matures.
Your debt would be unaffordable, even after consolidation. When you’re struggling to keep up with payments and your debt has become a crisis, you might need a different solution. This is when you might want to consider a debt relief program that will help you get your debt under control. For some people, filing for bankruptcy might also be worth considering as a way to get relief.
Not all lines of credit are alike. The borrower's creditworthiness and relationship with the lender affect the terms of the lending agreement, as does bank competition, prevailing market conditions and the size of the line in question. Some lenders apply fixed amortization rates to outstanding balances on a line of credit, while some permit interest-only payments for a time, followed by a lump-sum payment of the principal. If the lender has the right to demand repayment at any time, this is called demand credit.
To start the process with Debt Consolidation Care you must provide your name, phone number, email, and unsecured debt number. Once submitted you can anticipate a phone call from someone to discuss the actual program available at Debt Consolidation. At the time of our review we attempted to get assistance via the Live Chat but no operators were available to assist. We also noted that the BBB provides an A rating for this company but doesn't list it as a debt settlement provider. We thought this was a bit strange and along with the lack of a transparent pricing structure, minimum debt requirement and the states Debt Consolidation Care survives proved to be disappointing.
The credit card debt reduction process usually takes between 12 months to three years, so consumers can wait for creditors helps to make the sensible decision to agree and negotiate. Besides the obvious good thing about reducing your debts, an additional benefit will be the assistance with creditor harassment. Debt relief companies normally contact all your creditors and tell them that you will be using a debt relief company so you are now represented. This is extremely essential in that it helps minimize or eliminate creditor calls. The conventional practice would be to direct all communication for the debt reduction firm that you are working together with. However, you will need to remain cognizant that original creditors can still contact you legally, but most will comply with such requests.
You might want to talk to the collector at least once, even if you don’t think you owe the debt or can’t repay it immediately. That way you can confirm whether it’s really your debt, and if it is, you can find out from the collector more information about it. In talking with a debt collector, be careful about sharing your personal or financial information, especially if you’re not already familiar with the collector.

As noted above, debt consolidation is the process of using different forms of financing to pay off other debts and liabilities. So when a consumer is saddled with different kinds of debt, they can apply for a loan to consolidate those debts into a single liability and pay them off. Payments are then made to the new debt until it is paid off in full.

Debt settlement may negatively affect your credit score, but not in all cases. In certain situations, there are ways to negotiate around the seven-year penalty you typically face for settling a debt. In normal circumstances, settling debt will create a negative item in your credit report that sticks around for seven years. When the clock starts depends on the status of the debt at the time of the settlement.
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Average credit card debt is closely tied to the total outstanding revolving debt. Over the years, the two have risen together, exhibiting strong correlation (0.6). Over the last decade, average credit card debt has grown at a faster pace – raising by 52% since the year 2000. In that time, outstanding revolving credit has grown with exactly half that rate – increasing 26%.
I would like to make sure I receive the $300 they agreed to send me that was in my account. I would also like a refund of $ the 1,372 for the balance of my payments $1972 paid - $300 paid to Rise - $300 refunded if I actually receive it = $1372. I was given terms of my program and if the terms changed, I should have been notified so I could decide if I wanted to stay with the program. To spite my repetitive calls to CCA about my creditor still calling and saying they had not received paperwork or heard from CCA they did nothing. The creditor informed me they didn't receive paperwork until late April which was 5 months after I joined in December). CCA said they were unable to make a settlement with the second creditor but I was able to do a VERY reasonable settlement within an hour. CCA never provided any information of what was going on even though there were issues apparently and that is extremely poor customer service. CCA benefits from delays in working settlements because they get additional monthly fees. They also benefit from getting a creditor to provide a higher amount due by waiting to get figures knowing these companies charge very high interest rates by the day because they get 34% of what they save in addition to the other $600 in other fees plus $60 per month. CCA failed to perform as advertised, failed to contact the customer, failed to reach out to creditors in a timely manner (took 4 months) and failed to make agreement with one creditor and settled for an amount much higher than I was able to settle for on my own within an hour of cancelling myself from their program. I have attached the email and term documents stating a 12 month program, and the amendment document removing a duplicated creditor and therefore lowering my monthly payment. If you need copies of the settlement figures I received from the creditor within one day of cancelling with CCA or my bank statements showing payments, please let me know. I want my refund as CCA did absolutely nothing for me in 6 months and wants to charge $1372 out of $1972 in fees.
Sorry, Nathan! Sorry, but I honestly have no idea what my credit score was. That’s not something I usually track. After all, if you’re not in debt who cares what it is? That said when we get ready to buy a house, I’ll probably be paying closer attention. Best wishes on your debt pay off. I can say now almost four years later, it has been very worth the effort.
For that matter, using National Debt Relief to settle your debts can actually cost you less than if you were to pay off credit card debts yourself over a five-year period. Here’s the math. If you owed $10,000 at 15% and your goal was to become debt free and assuming your monthly payment was $225 you would not be debt-free until the year 2020 and you would have paid $4688 in interest. In comparison, if we were to handle that $10,000 debt with a 20% fee it would cost you just $2000 or $2688 less than if you were to pay off that credit card debt yourself.
Debt relief programs at ACCC are designed to help you take control of your finances and make a plan to pay off your debts. In your first conversation with our expert credit counselors, we'll evaluate your financial situation to get a clear picture of what you owe and how best to pay it off. Then we'll work with you to create a workable budget – something you can live with, but one that will help you make significant progress toward your goal of being debt-free.
Worsening credit. Whether you use an intermediary or not, your credit score can take a serious hit when you agree to a debt settlement arrangement. Even though you've repaid the negotiated amount, the fact that you settled generally appears directly on your credit report even after the credit card account has been closed. And it stays there, dragging down your score, for up to seven years.
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