With a debt consolidation loan, a lender issues a single personal loan that you use to pay off other debts, such as balances on high-interest credit cards. You’ll pay fixed, monthly installments to the lender for a set time period, typically two to five years. The interest rate depends on your credit profile, and it usually doesn’t change during the life of the loan.
I have a dilemma that I would like to get your advice on. I have three loans that comprise of a secured office mortgage loan (1) and two unsecured consumer loans (2 & 3). Loan 1 is approx. $80,000, loan 2 is approx. $35,000 and loan 3 approx. $24,000. Loans 2 and 3 have a higher interest rate than loan 1. The loans are being paid on a monthly basis normally. The question is the following: assuming that I receive a lump sum of money of approx. the total amount of the loans (=$139,000) would it be wise to apply all the money towards the loans and discharge them or play it safer and divide among the loans, or pay higher loan and then go to second loan etc.?
Disclose all program fees and costs before you sign up for a debt resolution program Have easy-to-understand written policies about its debt resolution program Give you an estimate of how many months or years it will wait before making an offer to each creditor Estimate its intended results, but never guarantee a specific settlement amount Tell you how much money you must save up before it will begin making offers to your creditors Send all resolution offers to you for your approval

You’re so excited to take advantage of your 15% off exclusive cardmember “benefit,” and you rush to the store or website. You get there, and . . . they’re having a sale! At this point, they’re practically paying you to shop! (Listen, I’m a spender at heart, so I know how to spin this.) So you wind up going on a $150 shopping spree—which is $50 over your budget.


Stick to your plan – When implementing the debt snowball plan, you need to pay the minimum amount due on all your other debts, except the one at the top of your list. Once you pay off your first debt, apply the payment from that debt to the next one – don't pocket the savings. Continue to pay only the minimum amount on all of your other debts. Eventually you will work down the list until they are all paid off.

Possible late payments: The Federal Trade Commission recommends you keep paying your creditors until you receive written confirmation from them noting they have accepted your DMP. Then check with your credit counselor to make sure payments will be made by each account's due date every month, and follow up with creditors to confirm the agency is paying bills on time.


The cost of credit is the additional amount, over and above the amount borrowed, that the borrower has to pay. It includes interest, arrangement fees and any other charges. Some costs are mandatory, required by the lender as an integral part of the credit agreement. Other costs, such as those for credit insurance, may be optional; the borrower chooses whether or not they are included as part of the agreement.
If the economy continues to be strong, then you can expect these rate increases to continue. So, if you’re thinking of using do-it-yourself credit card consolidation, now is the time to do it. In this case, time is not on your side. But the good news is that these economic changes don’t affect professionally assisted credit consolidation. Since you have an advocate that negotiates interest rates directly with your creditors, economic fluctuations don’t affect these programs.
Did you answer yes to any of the three questions above? If so, it might be worth doing some initial research to see if you can prequalify for any attractive loan offers. “If you currently have multiple debt obligations that you are juggling, a consolidation loan can be a way to simplify your life and possibly save on interest costs,” says Greg McBride, CFA, Bankrate chief financial analyst. “A good candidate is a borrower who has steady income, decent credit, a discipline to refrain from running up more debt and a desire to pay off what is currently owed.”
Lower interest rates and monthly payments. A debt consolidation loan or debt management program should reduce the amount of interest you pay on your debt, plus get you a monthly payment that is more in line with your income. The stability of knowing that you have an affordable monthly payment that eventually will eliminate your debt can remove a lot of the anxiety associated with the problem.
*For complete information, see the offer terms and conditions on the issuer or partner's website. Once you click apply you will be directed to the issuer or partner's website where you may review the terms and conditions of the offer before applying. We show a summary, not the full legal terms – and before applying you should understand the full terms of the offer as stated by the issuer or partner itself. While Experian Consumer Services uses reasonable efforts to present the most accurate information, all offer information is presented without warranty.

You may be able to consolidate with a loan from your local bank or credit union, an online lender that offers personal loans, or by transferring a balance from a high-rate credit card to a low-rate one. If you get a consolidation loan online, be sure to deal with reputable lenders as there are scammers who will take the information consumers submit with applications and use it fraudulently.


So I tend to take a conservative approach to these types of questions and I’m always on guard against the worst case scenario. The interest rates on your CC debt are pretty high, much higher than a mortgage would be, and I think it’s likely in your best interest to pay those off (leave a little set aside as an emergency fund if you can)…and then start saving up for your house. You might pay the high interest accounts first and then, if you can, pay off the defrred account before September. That will likely be more efficient, so you aren’t draining money to interest each month. Best of luck.
If you stop making payments on a debt, you can end up paying late fees or interest. You could even face collection efforts or a lawsuit filed by a creditor or debt collector. Also, if the company negotiates a successful debt settlement, the portion of your debt that’s forgiven could be considered taxable income on your federal income taxes — which means you may have to pay taxes on it.
As a Non-Profit, BBB A+ Accredited member since 1999, you can have faith in our business to provide legitimate financial help and stay with you throughout your journey. You don’t have to take our word for it, you can read the thousands of testimonials we have from real people who were once in debt, but now have a clean slate and a bright financial future: Credit Counseling Service Reviews
"Coming to ACCC was the best thing that ever happened for our family. When people express to me they are drowning in debt and need help, I always give them ACCC's information and explain how understanding the people who answer the phones are. I explain that I was never made to feel bad about my situation. On the contrary, I felt empowered after getting my accounts enrolled with ACCC, as it helped me gain control over my spending."
Debt consolidation programs typically start with a screening from a debt counselor to determine whether the program will be able to help. If you qualify for the program and decide to enroll, the debt consolidation program will take over the repayment of all your outstanding debts. Although all your credit card and debt accounts will still exist, you’ll provide the company a single payment each month, which it’ll apply toward your debts. Many debt consolidation companies charge you some sort of fee for their services, so it’s important to understand how that can affect your repayment strategy as well.
U.S. debt settlement differs slightly. There are several indicators that few consumers actually have their debt eliminated by full and final settlement. A survey of U.S. debt settlement companies found that 34.4% of enrollees had 75 percent or more of their debt settled within three years.[7] Data released by the Colorado Attorney General showed that only 11.35 percent of consumers who had enrolled more than three years earlier had all of their debt settled.[8] And when asked to show that most of their customers are better off after debt settlement, industry leaders said that would be an "unrealistic measure." [9]
Each state has its own set of rules regarding outstanding debts. Some states don't allow a debt collector to collect a certain type of debt after a certain period of time; others limit the amount of time when a creditor can sue you over an old debt. Either way, you should find out whether the statute of limitations has passed regarding an old debt you may owe. If it has passed, you can likely forgo repayment without worrying about financial, legal or credit consequences plaguing you.
Once the repayments are negotiated you will usually set up an account with the credit counseling agency and pay one lump sum a month into the account. The credit counseling agency will then disburse the payments out to each creditor. This benefits you because you only have to make one payment, and additionally it gives creditors more assurance that your payments will be made on time every month.

Credit card consolidation - is it right for you? If you're carrying a high interest rate across multiple cards, you may benefit from such services. With more and more Americans facing large medical bills, job loss, and other financial setbacks, credit card debt is higher than ever. And, with interest rates and late fees, it's not unusual for people to get in over their heads. Credit card consolidation helps consumers to better manage their debt and get back on solid financial footing once more.
×