4. Use a peer-to-peer lender. In an ideal world, you would pay off your credit card in full and be free and clear. But if you can’t do that, consider borrowing money to pay off your card from a peer-to-peer lender, such as LendingClub.com or Prosper.com. These secure sites offer loans with fixed interest rates that can be 20 to 30 percent lower than most credit cards, meaning you could save hundreds of dollars in interest on your debt, says Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, a cofounder of AskTheMoneyCoach.com, a personal finance site. If you have a job and a good credit score, you may qualify to make an online loan request for up to about $25,000.
Thank you so much for your generous feedback, Aaron. We couldn't be any happier than to know you have completed your graduation path and reached your goal of financial freedom! We also want to thank you for all your inspiring words and support you give to our company. We applaud you for this great accomplishment! If you ever have any questions or concerns, please contact Client Services at (800) 655-6303 or email us at [email protected] Thank you for being the best part of Freedom Debt Relief!

I am only 22 years young already in debt. I was married and divorced already, homeless, pregnant(which ended in termination=() and sitting on debt. It has been so overwhelming for me but I am so determined to make my new year which is Nov 23 the year of financial freedom! I am tired of being consumed with debt, a horrible credit score and the stress it causes me. I also have a blog and want to start gaining income from it. I’ve been reading up on ways to gain traffic so that I can lead affiliates my way and ads to boost some monetary gains. Although I know this journey will be tough and Ill need to be extremely fugal, I am excited to share with the world that it is possible to be debt free, especially if I can do it!
The debt-snowball method is a debt-reduction strategy, whereby one who owes on more than one account pays off the accounts starting with the smallest balances first, while paying the minimum payment on larger debts. Once the smallest debt is paid off, one proceeds to the next larger debt, and so forth, proceeding to the largest ones last.[1] This method is sometimes contrasted with the debt stacking method, also called the "debt avalanche method", where one pays off accounts on the highest interest rate first.[2][3]
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The drawback is that while you are not paying those bills, the interest is continuing to pile on, meanwhile, your credit score is tanking. The added interest plus the attorney’s fees could negate any cost savings from the settlement. This option could work if your debt is already in collections and you have savings or access to money that would cover a large chunk of your debt. If you can’t settle the debt right away, another option will probably work better for you.
6 Your loan terms, including APR, may differ based on loan purpose, amount, term length, and your credit profile. Rate is quoted with AutoPay discount. AutoPay discount is only available prior to loan funding. Rates without AutoPay are 0.50% higher. Subject to credit approval. Conditions and limitations apply. Advertised rates and terms are subject to change without notice.

An unsecured debt, in contrast, involves no collateral but instead is based on a contractual agreement entered into by the borrower and lender at the beginning of the relationship. Common examples of unsecured debts are credit cards, student loans, or utility bills. The risk of default on an unsecured loan is that your debt could be turned over to a collection agency and a lawsuit may be filed against you for repayment. Lenders of unsecured debt will be more stringent about pursuing repayment because their money has not been guaranteed. Unsecured debts generally have higher interest rates because of the increased risk taken on by creditors. Take credit cards, for instance – the average interest rate on credit cards today is around 14.9 percent. Payments made on unsecured debts usually fluctuate based on the outstanding balance.
Although each of these debt relief options deals with credit card debt specifically, they are also able to deal with other types of debt including personal loans, medical debt, accounts in collections and more (depending on the specific program type). Still, these programs have not been enough to help enough Americans get out of debt, resulting in a government call-to-action by economists for a massive debt bailout.[10]
Here at Ramsey, we like cash—but this is one instance when we don’t recommend it. You have to spend thousands on a credit card to get a measly $100 cash back. And by the way, it’s probably just a credit applied to your account, not actual cash in your pocket. Plus, that cash back is a fraction of what you’ve paid in interest on the credit card debt.
I enjoy reading debt-payoff stories like these. I also started with the debt snowball method and paid off my student loans in 3 years. (No husband, no kids, still living at home). Now, I have a mortgage, a new car (big mistake) and a boyfriend. I’m trying to pay off my mortgage as fast as possible, but it’s so hard to determine where your money should go each month ie: emergency savings, debt, or retirement accounts.
If you can tell us a little more about your situation, we may be of more help to you. I understand wanting to avoid bankruptcy, but your situation may make a BK filing your best option. Certainly not all companies in the debt relief space are scams, but I would say there are many that are out there looking out for themselves and not their clients, and even more that might be trying to help, but are just plain not good at it.
A government may be changed either into an oligarchy, democracy, or a free state; when the magistrates, or any part of the city acquire great credit, or are increased in power, as the court of Areopagus at Athens, having procured great credit during the Median war, added firmness to their administration; and, on the other hand, the maritime force, composed of the commonalty, having gained the victory at Salamis, by their power at sea, got the lead in the state, and strengthened the popular party: and at Argos, the nobles, having gained great credit by the battle of Mantinea against the Lacedaemonians, endeavoured to dissolve the democracy.
In this situation, a certified credit counselor helps you find one consolidated payment that will fit your budget. Then they call each of your creditors to negotiate. It’s basically the exact same thing you do yourself. The difference is that these agencies have established relationships with creditors and proven records of helping other people get out of debt. So, even when a creditor won’t work with you, they often sign off on your enrollment in a DMP.
If your credit card interest rates are so high it feels almost impossible to make headway on your balances, it’s worth calling your card issuer to negotiate. Believe it or not, asking for lower interest rates is actually quite commonplace. And if you have a solid history of paying your bills on time, there’s a good possibility of getting a lower interest rate.
Your welcome! I think the discouragement comes from people not realizing it takes only one step. Just one to make a difference. It seems so out of reach, but in reality it’s not. I really think it is a matter of a few small changes adding up over time. Excited this article got the traffic it has gotten. Congratulations on becoming debt free….and crashing your server ;)

National Debt Relief is a ten-year-old company headquartered in the financial district of New York City. Since our founding in 2009 we have helped more than 100,000 families and individuals become debt free by resolving more than $1 billion in unsecured debts. The company is Better Business Bureau accredited and has consistently maintained an A+ rating. National Debt Relief is a member of the US Chamber of Commerce and the American Fair Credit Council (AFCC). This organization is the watchdog of the debt settlement industry. It demands that its members operate with clarity, fairness, trust and legitimacy. There is no doubt about the fact that any company that belongs to the AFCC is one that can be trusted to treat you honestly and ethically.
Debt consolidation loans can save you money in interest charges, make budgeting easier and reduce bill-paying stress. If not used wisely, though, a debt consolidation loan can add to your troubles. For example, you take out a loan to pay off credit cards and then start using those cards again, you are digging an even deeper hole that you may not be able to climb out of.
Worsening credit. Whether you use an intermediary or not, your credit score can take a serious hit when you agree to a debt settlement arrangement. Even though you've repaid the negotiated amount, the fact that you settled generally appears directly on your credit report even after the credit card account has been closed. And it stays there, dragging down your score, for up to seven years.
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