Debt settlement is a debt relief option that focuses on getting you out of debt for a percentage of what you owe. It’s also commonly called debt negotiation because you negotiate to only pay back a portion of the outstanding balance. In exchange, the creditor or collector discharges whatever is left. As a result, debt settlement is often the fastest, cheapest way to get out of debt without declaring bankruptcy for many consumers.
Accredited Debt Relief is a reputable company that helps customers reduce their debt obligations by matching them with partner services. Just by looking at their "Proven Results" page, it's easy to see the advantages of working with ADR. For example, their customers with debts owed to Bank of America were able to reach settlements that saved them anywhere from 52-80% of the original amounts owed. Similar results are listed for clients of HSBC, The Home Depot, Sears, and many other businesses. According to the fine print at the bottom of the page, Accredited Debt Relief tells clients to expect to pay up to 75% of their enrolled debt balance, which includes any fees charged by ADR's debt relief partners, over the course of two to four years.
Debt-free people know that they have the freedom to live and give generously. They know that the more they keep their hands open, the more fun they can have with money. Whether they’re helping their family, friends, church or a mission they believe in, it’s always more fun to contribute to a bigger cause than stockpile it for themselves. Rachel Cruze says, “Giving is the most fun you’ll ever have with money.” Try it and see for yourself!
3. Transfer your balance (cautiously). It’s tempting to move a balance from a card with a high interest rate to a card with a substantially lower one (find one at Bankrate.com). And potentially that’s a smart move; you can save hundreds of dollars a year. But be careful: You should transfer a balance only if you’re committed to paying off the debt within an introductory low-interest-rate window (which typically lasts 12 to 18 months after the first billing cycle closes) and to making monthly payments on time, says Arnold. Otherwise your rate could skyrocket, possibly ending up higher than the one you just got rid of. (Important: You should also avoid making any purchases with the new card, as sometimes the low interest rate won’t apply to them.) In addition, know that you’ll probably be charged a balance-transfer fee, which is usually about 3 to 4 percent of the total amount transferred.
Once you complete a plan to repay your debt, you should also complete a thorough review of your credit report. Creditor should automatically inform the credit bureaus that your account is paid or current. However, mistakes and errors happen frequently, particularly following a period of financial hardship. That means it’s up to you to make sure your credit report is up to date and that old errors aren’t hanging around.
Minimum payment due, reads the box on your credit card statement. What an enticing idea: Pay a small amount and you’re off the hook for the whole bill—for a while, anyway. Alas, as the more than 45 percent of Americans who carry a balance every month know, that rotating charge usually comes back to bite you, and figuring out how to get out of credit card debt is no small thing. For example, a cardholder who owes $15,956—the average amount of debt per household, according to Ben Woolsey, the director of marketing and consumer research for CreditCards.com, a credit card comparison site—will end up shelling out an additional $11,000 in total interest if she pays only the minimum each month.
Colorado's shortage of mental health providers means 70% of the residents seeking mental or behavioral health care are not receiving those services. Minimum federal standards require that there be at least one psychiatrist for every 30,000 residents. For Colorado to reach that threshold, they would need to add more than 90 mental-health professionals.
I would like to say Thank you for the outstanding service that you gave me. I started the program just four short years ago and in March I will be debt free. With your help in setting better plans with my creditors I was able to accomplish this. It was hard work, but it was all worth it at the end. The Consolidated credit counselors are the best; they answered all of my question(s) and helped me every step of the way.
5. If you’re really strapped, make two minimum payments each month. Card issuers typically charge interest on a daily basis, “so the sooner you make a payment, the faster your average daily balance is reduced, which translates into fewer dollars in interest that you ultimately pay,” says Gerri Detweiler, the director of consumer education for Credit.com, a personal finance website. If you’re on a tight budget, go ahead and pay the minimum due each month, then try to make the same payment again two weeks later. Keep making a payment of the initial minimum-due amount twice a month until your debt is paid off. (To keep track, put a reminder on your calendar.) Case in point: Say you charged $2,000 on a card with a 17 percent interest rate. If you make only the minimum monthly payment (which is about 2 percent of the balance), it will take more than 21 years to pay off the balance. But if you make an additional payment of the original amount two weeks later, you will be debt-free in less than three (!) years.

If you are unable to meet multiple credit card payments as your interest payments increase or if you simply want to move from a credit lifestyle to a savings lifestyle, it may be time to consolidate your credit card payments so you can erase your credit card debt. Debt consolidation means to bring all of your balances to a single bill and it can be a useful way to manage your debt.
Alongside the unprecedented spike in personal debt loads, there has been another rather significant (even if criminally[clarification needed] under-reported) change: the new legislation in 2005 that dramatically worsened the chances for average Americans to claim Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection. As things stand, should anyone filing for bankruptcy fail to meet the Internal Revenue Service regulated ‘means test’, they would instead be shelved into the Chapter 13 debt restructuring plan. Essentially, Chapter 13 bankruptcies simply tell borrowers that they must pay back some or all of their debts to all unsecured lenders. Repayments under Chapter 13 can range from 1% to 100% of the amounts owed to unsecured creditors, based on the ability of the debtor to pay. Repayment periods are three years (for those who earn below the median income) or five years (for those above), under court mandated budgets that follow IRS guidelines, and the penalties for failure are more severe.

Stick to your plan – When implementing the debt snowball plan, you need to pay the minimum amount due on all your other debts, except the one at the top of your list. Once you pay off your first debt, apply the payment from that debt to the next one – don't pocket the savings. Continue to pay only the minimum amount on all of your other debts. Eventually you will work down the list until they are all paid off.
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